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2017 Montana Legislature

Jackie Yamanaka

U.S. Senator Jon Tester said repeal of the federal Affordable Care Act appears imminent.

Tester was invited to speak today before the Montana House of Representatives. Tester said there’s an incredible opportunity to find a bipartisan solution that can make healthcare affordable for middle class families.


Legislative Services

Montana identified over $830,000 in Medicaid payments that went out to people who don’t deserve the federal-state healthcare program aimed at helping the working poor. 

Montana’s Medicaid expansion program, known as the HELP Act, was passed by the 2015 Montana Legislature and signed into law. It contained a provision to tackle waste, fraud and abuse.


Jackie Yamanaka

By MICHAEL SIEBERT

Community News Service

University of Montana School of Journalism

Budget subcommittees proposed further cuts to Gov. Steve Bullock’s budget throughout the second week of the Montana Legislature.

“If we can get through the budget and balance it, that will be probably all we can do,” said Rep. Nancy Ballance, R-Hamilton.

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Jackie Yamanaka

U.S. Senator Jon Tester said repeal of the federal Affordable Care Act appears imminent.

Tester was invited to speak today before the Montana House of Representatives. Tester said there’s an incredible opportunity to find a bipartisan solution that can make healthcare affordable for middle class families.


Legislative Services

Montana identified over $830,000 in Medicaid payments that went out to people who don’t deserve the federal-state healthcare program aimed at helping the working poor. 

Montana’s Medicaid expansion program, known as the HELP Act, was passed by the 2015 Montana Legislature and signed into law. It contained a provision to tackle waste, fraud and abuse.


(Brie Ripley)

25-years-ago, a New York Times reporter traveled to Montana to interview Gwen Kircher for a story on race in America.

Based on award winning journalist Dirk Johnson's original article, and in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, YPR's Brie Ripley shares this audio postcard on what life's like, presently, for a black woman in a predominately white state.


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In some parts of the South, there's an accent where every conversation sounds like a song. Brent Cobb, a native of the small town of Ellaville, Ga., doesn't quite whistle through his teeth when he speaks, but he does push more air into his S's when he sings.

The abortion rate in the United States fell to its lowest level since the historic Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision legalized abortion nationwide, a new report finds.

The report by the Guttmacher Institute, a research group that supports legalized abortion, puts the rate at 14.6 abortions per 1,000 women of childbearing age (ages 15-44) in 2014. That's the lowest recorded rate since the Roe decision in 1973. The abortion rate has been declining for decades — down from a peak of 29.3 in 1980 and 1981.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Two bills introduced today in the Montana Legislature hope to bring some stability to the community and workers in Colstrip. Both were a result of bipartisan work done in the legislative interim, after plant owners settled a lawsuit with environmental groups, agreeing to shut down two of Colstrip’s four units by 2022.

Evening Newscast 01-16-17

13 hours ago

  

Montana firefighters are again hoping legislators can pass a bill to make it easier for them to secure workers' compensation.

Imagine driving your car, talking on your cell phone, then getting pulled over, ticketed and fined for it. Right now, cities and towns in Montana can individually decide whether or not that’s lawful. House Bill 194 would change that, barring anyone in the state from being legally punished for driving and using a device.

U.S. Senator Jon Tester said repeal of the federal Affordable Care Act appears imminent. He told legislators ripping it away without a replacement ready to take over will cause harm

A local chapter of a national organization that promotes greater scrutiny of Muslims in the name of national security laid out its goals for the year this weekend.