The Latest from the Montana Legislature

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House Approves Smaller Fuel Tax Increase To Fix Roads And Bridges

A bill to increase the fuel tax continues to advance down the road as the Legislative session is moving closer to adjournment. “And I find myself in the middle of Montana in the 65 th Legislative Session in a very odd position where I feel the need to quote Mick Jagger,” said Representative Frank Garner, R-Kalispell. “And that is you don’t always get what you want.”

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After months of drafting and amending, the Associated Students of the University of Wyoming passed a much debated resolution to fly a flag symbolizing LGBTQ visibility, strength and allyship.

ASUW Vice President Tyler Wolfgang got the idea to fly the flag on campus after a gunman opened fire at a LGBTQ nightclub in Florida and killed 49 people last summer.

"I felt trapped in Laramie working in ASUW when there was no one in the community talking about what happened in Orlando," said Wolfgang. "So I felt that a significant way of showing solidarity and inclusion for the LGBTQ  community during Pride Month—which is in June—in Laramie was well needed."

MT Legislature

The chair of the Montana Republican Party announced today his candidacy for mayor of the state’s largest city. YPR's Jackie Yamanaka caught up with Jeff Essmann, as he’s also a legislator who’s served in both the Senate and House.

 

 

 

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jay Hahnkamp is an unlikely children’s author. He’s a rancher with a small place near southwest Montana, and he has two children’s books to his name.

His most recent book carries a simple message: no matter the obstacles in life, a child can strive to be whatever he or she wants to be. This message is carried by the author’s real-life cow and best friend the goat.  


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Thank You!

Thank you for a successful spring pledge drive! We surpassed our minimum goal of $210,000 and have counted $234,911 pledges insofar. That's 1,806 individual gifts and 314 brand new donors.

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Latest Episodes Of

Jackie Yamanaka

Capitol Connections: Final Days of Negotiations

The 65th Session of the Montana Legislature is winding down, but there are pieces yet to be put into place before lawmakers can adjourn. Senate Majority Leader Fred Thomas, R-Stevensville, talks about the negotiations taking place with the Governor to bring this session to a close.

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Trump, The Golfer In Chief

5 hours ago

Not long ago, both the Economist and the New Yorker magazines featured unflattering cover portraits of President Trump holding a golf club. Both seemed to suggest the president had found himself in a rough patch.

Inside a tiny, hard-to-find storefront in Brooklyn lies the darkly whimsical world of a most unusual "candy alchemist."

He calls himself "Eugene J.," and this real-life Willy Wonka is whipping up his own new confections across town from where Roald Dahl's Charlie and the Chocolate Factory will open on Broadway later this month.

Not much is known about this quiet man in black, who prefers to keep the focus on the candy. Behind a purple satin curtain, he toils away on his latest invention.

Voices From The March For Science

5 hours ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The 700 cows on Brett Reinford's dairy farm are making more than just milk.

Each day, the girls are producing 7,000 gallons of manure. And that smells exactly like you'd imagine. "We had gotten complaints from neighbors in the past that had said, 'Hey, it stinks too much. Can you do something about it?' " Reinford says.

So he looked around for a solution and landed on a device called a digester. A digester tamps down the smell a bit, but, more importantly, it takes all that cow poop and converts it to electricity.

This story is part of Kitchen Table Conversations, a series from NPR's National Desk that examines how Americans from all walks of life are moving forward from the presidential election. This is the third post-election visit with Jamie Ruppert, 33, of White Haven, Pa.

Jamie Ruppert, 33, switched parties and voted for Donald Trump in November, and for months has been his enthusiastic supporter.

With student debt at a staggering $1.3 trillion, many families are facing a huge financial dilemma: their final springtime decisions about college enrollment and acceptance. The NPR Ed team teamed up with Weekend Edition to answer some listener questions about debt and degrees.

Waiting on the numbers

Marcy, from Union City, N.J. has twin girls going off to college in September.

With any new president, there's a learning curve. But for President Trump, it's been steeper than others.

"Mount Everest" is how Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the Miller Center at the University of Virginia, described it ahead of Trump's 100th day in office, which is coming up Saturday, April 29. "It's as steep as they come and ice-covered, and he didn't bring very many knowledgeable Sherpas with him."

Can all hope be lost?

I used to think not.

I used to think that no matter how tough life gets for people, they always have hope to cling to – to get them through it.

Then I met some Rohingya refugees on a trip to Bangladesh last month. Reporter Michael Sullivan and I were there to report on the latest wave of the Muslim minority group to flee over the border from Buddhist-majority Myanmar.

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