Brie Ripley

All Things Considered Host

Phone: 406-657-2972
Email: brie@ypradio.org
Twitter: @brieripley

Brie Ripley learned to make radio as an intern for KNKX's Sound Effect and KUOW's ​The Record; she was mentored by podcast producer Arwen Nicks and managing editor/producer Jeannie Yandel. 

She holds a BA in Journalism from the University of Washington (2015) and studied radio storytelling at the Transom Traveling Workshop (2016).

Raised in Seattle, Ripley spent childhood summers at camp in Yellowstone Valley.
She joined Yellowstone Public Radio's news team in 2016.

(Flickr/Kellie Parker) (https://flic.kr/p/mCKgS)

After months of drafting and amending, the Associated Students of the University of Wyoming passed a much debated resolution to fly a flag symbolizing LGBTQ visibility, strength and allyship.

ASUW Vice President Tyler Wolfgang got the idea to fly the flag on campus after a gunman opened fire at a LGBTQ nightclub in Florida and killed 49 people last summer.

"I felt trapped in Laramie working in ASUW when there was no one in the community talking about what happened in Orlando," said Wolfgang. "So I felt that a significant way of showing solidarity and inclusion for the LGBTQ  community during Pride Month—which is in June—in Laramie was well needed."

MSU Billings

The last time Abenayaa (Abena) Lane was told to return to her "home country" was just before the presidential election in the fall.

She was shopping at a Walmart in Billings while wearing a head scarf, her hijab, when someone told her that when Trump becomes president, she will need to leave the Big Sky State.

Lane is a soldier in the U.S. Army studying sociology and criminal justice at MSU Billings. She told YPR’s Brie Ripley about one of the first times she felt unwanted in America for being Muslim. 


(WildEarth Guardians)

The Northern Cheyenne tribe, along with a coalition of conservation groups, sued the Trump administration Wednesday for lifting a moratorium on coal leases on public lands.

The southeastern Montana tribe filed the lawsuit in response to Interior Secretary Zinke’s decision to lift the moratorium on coal leasing.

(Flickr/Heather) (https://flic.kr/p/gyrNx1)

The Wyoming Business Council voted unanimously Thursday to declare Washakie, Fremont and Big Horn counties disaster areas. This came in response to last year’s weather that resulted in major crop loss, economically affecting about 60 families that are represented by the Wyoming Sugar Company.

Sugar beets are third largest agricultural revenue driver for Wyoming, and when months of rain muddied farms last winter – followed by a two-week deep freeze, many crops were devastated.

(Flickr Photo/Shannon Patrick) (https://flic.kr/p/dVnX4W)

Northern Plains Resource Council is the lead plaintiff in a lawsuit filed today challenging the Trump Administration’s approval of the Keystone XL pipeline. A coalition of environmental groups are part of the lawsuit filed in federal district court in Great Falls.

Northern Plains is challenging the permit based on what they call “outdated and incomplete information” from a 2014 Environmental Impact Statement used to determine the pipeline’s threat to the health of water, land, and communities it crosses​.

(Left, © AP; right, Penguin & Random House)

The Billings Gazette reports that over the last five years, Yellowstone County, the largest county in the state, prosecuted only about 15% of adult rape cases. And last year, there were precisely zero prosecutions out of the 60 rape cases reported in the county.

Jon Krakauer is the author of the bestselling book Missoula: Rape and the Justice System In a College Town which, explores a spate of unprosecuted sexual assaults in one of Montana's largest cities between 2008-2012.

Krakauer spoke with YPR's Brie Ripley about why Yellowstone County needs a Department of Justice intervention.

(Flickr/B.C. Lorio) (https://flic.kr/p/RGxkhd)

American Muslims and constitutional law experts say that bills to prevent the use of a specific kind of Islamic code in courts are frivolous measures meant to spread fears and sow suspicion of Islam.

The Montana Legislature is one of the states considering a bill to prohibit the use of foreign laws.

Senate Bill 97's text doesn't single out any religion or culture, but both proponents and opponents believe that the intent of the law is clear.

(Photo by Marina Starr)

Declaring today as a "great day for American jobs," President Trump reversed an Obama administration decision and issued a permit to continue building the $8-billion-dollar Keystone XL pipeline

Some Eastern Montanan farmers and Fort Peck Reservation residents near the pipeline's route don't agree. They believe the environmental and social risk the pipeline poses is greater than a potentially short-lived economic boost for the state.

About two-dozen water protectors are walking across the Fort Peck Reservation this weekend to pray and demonstrate opposition of the pipeline's construction in the state.

(Photo by Lyman Gillen)

Community members have been gathering monthly at the Billings Public Library to discuss and reflect on Native American issues.

This month's lecture was by Aubrey Bertram, staff attorney for the Indian Law Practice group of the Montana Legal Services Association.

"I think it's so important to understand our context and to understand our history," said Bertram. "You can't meaningfully function and you can't really engage with present society if you don't understand how we got to where we are in the first place."

(Flickr/Todd Klassy) (https://flic.kr/p/qukd81)

Yesterday, the Billings Gazette reported that three oil refineries and a sugar beet factory in town are not polluting the air.

They interviewed a couple of staff from nearby facilities but did not talk to David Klemp– Air Quality Bureau Chief for the Department of Environmental Quality– the guy who's in charge of this information.

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